The U.S. Constitution Wasn't Always For Everyone

228 years ago yesterday the delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed the U.S Constitution. The Constitution is a document that has been revered for over two centuries as a miracle in legal drafting. It has weathered the test of time through its ability to grow and change to fit the America's evolving cultural norms through amendment and through thoughtful interpretation. Yet, despite its changes over the years, it has remained steadfast in protecting the important principals at its core.

In fact, the Constitution has changed quite a bit more than many people think. Take for example, the right to vote -- a right that surely most would agree forms the very foundation of a strong democracy. Some would be surprised to learn that most voters today would not have had the right to vote under the original Constitution. Women, African-Americans, Catholics and white men without substantial property holdings could not vote under the Constitution as it was originally drafted. Addressing this issue, Abigail Adams wrote a charming, though pointed, letter to her husband John Adams on March 31, 1776 reminding him “To Remember the Ladies.” But it was not until the 15th Amendment that the Constitution gave black men the vote, and not until the 19th Amendment did it actually “remember the Ladies.”

So, celebrate the Constitution this week. Celebrate the great men who drafted it. And celebrate the men and women who have worked for the last 228 years to nurture and help the Constitution grow so that it continues to protect an ever-evolving United States of America.

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