Wal-Mart 2.0 - New Round of Sex Discrimination Cases Filed

Four months after the Supreme Court through out their national class-action lawsuit, lawyers representing the many, many, many women who claim that Wal-Mart Stores has discriminated against them filed a new lawsuit last week.  The suit seeks to make its way past the some of the obstacles set in the women's path by the Supreme Court by narrowing their claims to the California stores of the retail chain.

See our previous coverage of the Supreme Court's opinion throwing the women's claims out here.

The original case involved class of approximately 1.5 million women.  The Supreme Court through the case out largely on the argument that such a large group of women could not be shown to have enough in common with their claims to make a class action appropriate.  The class in the new 2.0 lawsuit is limited to approximately 90,000 women.  The Supreme Court did not rule on the merits of the case, nor did it preclude class actions consistent with its new guidelines and standards.  

 

One of the Lead lawyers representing the women, Brad Seligman, said

“We’re back. This case and the fight for justice for the women of Wal-Mart are not over. The complaint filed against California Wal-Mart is well within Supreme Court guidelines and we are determined to see that California Wal-Mart women employees who have been waiting up to 11 years for justice finally get their day in court.”

Class counsel expect to file additional cases around the country in the coming months. Information about filing claims can be found at www.walmartclass.com.

Named California Plaintiffs are current Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., employees Betty Dukes, a 17-year employee who works at a cashier/greeter in a Contra Costa County Wal-Mart, and Christine Kwapnoski, a 25-year employee who works as an assistant manager in a Contra Costa County Sam’s Club, a division of Wal-Mart.  Ms. Dukes was the lead plaintiff in the original 1.0 Wal-Mart class action case as well.

 

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